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 United Kingdom
2 properties 

Alford

    • Alford Postcode AB33
    • Alford Latitude 57.2314800943587° N Longitude: -2.700078793579601° W
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    Alford Aberdeenshire, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, if your staying in Alford take advantage of the outdoor activities including fishing, the lake camp and the dry ski centre.

    Alford is a large village in Aberdeenshire, north east Scotland, lying just south of the River Don. It lies within the Howe of Alford which occupies the middle reaches of the River Don, a modern village in the centre of a rich arable vale sheltered by the hills.

    Alford Aberdeenshire, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, Alford is a large village in Aberdeenshire, north east Scotland, lying just south of the River Don. It lies within the Howe of Alford which occupies the middle reaches of the River Don, a modern village in the centre of a rich arable vale sheltered by the hills.

    The area is famous for a battle and a poet.

    The battle took place on 2 July 1645, at the height of the Marquess of Montrose summer campaign in aid of the otherwise failing cause of Charles I.

    Having defeated the Covenanting General Urry at Aurdearn near Nairn, Montrose moved South via Corgarff to battle with General Baillie, he took his stand on a hill to the West of the present village.

    Baillie was out numbered and did not intend to give battle, but was drawn across the Don and into the fray by skilful manoeuvring, Cavalry and infantry became confused, and the rear of the Covenanting force was enveloped and the army routed. It was a victory that cost Montrose dear, for he lost in it his devoted friend and ally, Lord George Gordon, the eldest son of the Marquess of Huntly.

    The poet of Alford was Charles Murray, born at East gate in 1864, who achieved a world wide renowned with his nostalgic and patriot poems in Hamewith.

    Alford played a notable part in the farming revolution at the end of the 18th cent, by the time the railway had come in 1859, the hill of Callievar was cultivated up to 950 of its 1,480 feet.

     Alford lost its railway in 1966, in common with much of the rest of rural Britain, in 1983 the village became the location of the Grampian railway museum.

    South of the village is the now restored tower of Balfluig, and there are interesting monuments in the kirkyard of the old parish church, the centre of the original Kirkton,

    As well as the transport and railway museums the village offers visitors a Heritage Centre. Enjoy the great activities that Alford has to offer including a dry ski slope, a swimming pool, and a golf club, so if your looking for an active holiday or a quite vacation Alford fits the bill.

    It also offers a large parkland camping and caravanning site in Haughton Country Park.

    Beside the A944 as it enters Alford from the east is a life size bronze statue of an Aberdeen Angus bull, This celebrates the origins of the breed in Alford in the 1800s.

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